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XV Jornadas de Economía Laboral / XV Labour Economics Meeting

29 y 30 de junio, 1 de julio / June 29-30, July 1

Keynote speakers

Thursday 30th of June, 12:30h – 13:30h
Prof. Seamus McGuinness

Title: «MINIMUM WAGE EMPLOYMENT IN EUROPE – LESSONS FOR SPAIN»

Seamus McGuinness is a Research Professor and the Research Area Coordinator for labour market research at the Economic and Social Research Institute. He obtained his PhD in Economics from Queens University Belfast in 2003 and held posts at Queens University Belfast, the Northern Ireland Economic Research Centre and the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic & Social Research (University of Melbourne).

Most of his published research has been in the areas of labour economics and the economics of education, he has a particular expertise in the areas of education and skill mismatches. He is the designated expert on the Irish labour market in the European Commission’s European Employment and Policy Observatory (EEPO). In addition to his work on the Irish labour market, he has also led a number of European labour studies involving numerous international research partners.

Friday 1st of July, 12:30h – 13:30h
Prof. Brendan Burchell

Title: «WORKING CONDITIONS, WELL-BEING AND MENTAL HEALTH – LESSONS FROM THE PANDEMIC” 

Brendan Burchell is Professor in the Social Sciences, Chair of the Archaeology, Anthropology and Sociology Degree Committee at Cambridge University. After obtaining his PhD in Social Psychology at Warwick University, he was appointed in 1985 to the Department of Applied Economics at Cambridge, where he worked collaboratively with economists, social psychologists and sociologists on a variety of aspects of labour markets and their effects on individuals. Since 1988 he works at the Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Science at the Department of Sociology at Cambridge University.

His most recent research interest lie in the effects of labour market experiences (e.g. job insecurity, work intensification, zero hours contracts, part-time work, unemployment) on psychological well-being, as well as the social psychological effects of precarious employment and unemployment.